The Australian Medical Association Limited and state AMA entities comply with the Privacy Act 1988. Please refer to the AMA Privacy Policy to understand our commitment to you and information on how we store and protect your data.

×

Search

×

AMA – time for a 50th Anniversary check-up

The activities and discussions and formalities of our very successful 50th Anniversary National Conference are covered in detail elsewhere in this edition of Australian Medicine. I want to take this opportunity to explain to members another important activity that we are undertaking this year.

03 Jun 2012

The activities and discussions and formalities of our very successful 50th Anniversary National Conference are covered in detail elsewhere in this edition of Australian Medicine.

I want to take this opportunity to explain to members another important activity that we are undertaking this year.

Throughout its history, the AMA has changed and evolved and adapted to be able to lead effectively and to respond to issues, both external and internal.

So, as the AMA celebrates 50 years since separation from the British Medical Association, it is timely to reflect on the environment in which we operate.

The Federal Council has discussed the AMA’s governance structure over the course of the last two years, its impact on the efficient development of public policy, and its responsiveness to the membership.

Put simply, there is a widespread view that we can better utilise the expertise of Councillors by allowing the function of Federal Council to be exclusively about policy development and analysis.

The Federal Council recognises the need to be inclusive, represent the entire profession, and to use its time more effectively in what is becoming an increasingly complex and challenging health care environment.

This is consistent with current best practice, whereby every organisation should regularly review its own internal governance performance and structure to analyse whether it best aligns with the role, function and activities of the organisation.

To that end, the Council resolved to adopt a smaller board of governance for the Federal AMA.

The Council has not taken this step lightly.  It acknowledges the AMA’s history and the significant participation of the various stakeholders and other AMAs to the work of the Council.

However, the Council recognises that the AMA’s core purpose of representing the medical profession requires a more streamlined governance framework to diligently lead the operations of the AMA group of companies, while its representative framework enables it to comprehensively assimilate the voice of the profession into public policy advocacy.

The Council has resolved to embark on a consultation with the membership - who, after all, have the final determination in the matter – to become engaged in the options to achieve the particular model of a smaller board of governance.

We will be releasing a discussion paper and will conduct a State-by-State consultation process between July and October.

Council will be presented with the results of that consultation in November.

The next phase of governance reform will then be determined.

A report to all members will be provided immediately after that Council meeting.

I encourage you all to be a part of this process to help guide the AMA through the next 50 years of advocacy and achievement for members and for the Australian health system.


Published: 03 Jun 2012